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Current Operating Frequency and Mode

Probably QRT tonight and in the morning due to storms in the area

Fast QSB was the dominant feature on this quiet night in North America where modes with deeper detection limits enjoyed most success; Strong trans-Atlantic openings continue for WSPR users

– Posted in: 630 Meter Daily Reports, 630 Meters

The details for December 2, 2016 can be viewed here.

The UTC amateur registration database is here.

HERE are a few mode-specific comments addressing where modes are located now and probably where they are best placed in the future

Operator lists detailing stations that are two-way QSO-capable can be viewed here.

Spot stations calling CQ on any mode here on DXSummit and help them find a QSO

 

It was quiet in North America but the Mediterranean and Oceania / western Pacific continue to experience strong, lightning-rich storms.

11-hour worldwide lightning summary

 

Geomagnetic conditions are at quiet levels.  Solarham reports that another coronal hole is beginning to face Earth and a solar wind stream could bring G1 or G2 storm conditions beginning sometime on December 4.  The Bz is pointing slightly to the South this morning and solar wind velocities are averaging near 396 km/s.   DST values are riding the centerline and generally at positive levels.

 

 

 

Propagation was slow to stabilize during the evening as fast QSB was reported by a number of stations.  Modes that could handle potential deep decreases in S/N were likely to be the most successful during this session.  In the later evening a number of stations reported improving propagation.  Based on comments and reports, QSO modes suffered the most while WSPR reports look very good, even typical.  Activity was down a bit due to the 160-meter contest this weekend.

Reverse beacon network reports follow:

 

PSKReporter partial digital station distributions follow:

courtesy PSKReporter

 

The following stations provided reports of their two-way QSO’s as well as any additional activity that might have occurred during this session (this is not necessarily a complete list – only what was reported!):

Dave, AA1A, completed evening JT9 and CW QSO’s with N3FL.  He also reported at 0653z that “…K9SLQ 559 472.49 calling CQ

John, WA3ETD, completed early evening JT9 QSO’s with K9KFR, noting deep QSB.

Steve, K5DOG, completed a JT9 with K9KFR during the evening.

Tom, WB4JWM, completed JT9 QSO’s with K5DNL, K9KFR and K9MRI.

Ted, KC3OL, completed a JT9 QSO with K9MRI and K5DNL.  He reported that he was hearing JT9 from WB4JWM at -26 dB S/N at 0439z.

Ken, K5DNL, completed JT9 QSO’s with WB4JWM and KC3OL.  Using WSPR overnight, he reported twenty stations and he received reports from 93 unique stations including seven Canadian stations.  He shared two-way WSPR reports with K9FD (/KH6),  VE3CIQ and ZF1EJ.  Ken reported that band conditions were very good from his perspective.

Neil, W0YSE, reported not much luck with finding a QSO but the session wasn’t a bust.  Neil explains:

“No JT9 Q’s for me this session but I did see these guys on my JT9 screen this morning:

0448z at -5 (best) 0.1    935 @ CQ KA7OEI DN40
0514z at -18 (best) 0.1  1202 @ CQ K5DNL EM15

My JT9 CQ’s were decoded by KR7O, VE7SL, VE6XH, and VE6JY.

On WSPR I was heard by 38, with 1 spot by Eden, ZF1EJ. Here are the most distant…”

Mike, WA3TTS, reported that using WSPR, he heard “…23, (14) K9FD best -19 @ 0934 & 0726, (1) F5WK -23 0036, (1) G8HUH -30 0346, (1) W0YSE -26 1038, (31) ZF1EJ -16 0828

Robert, KR7O, reported “Low activity last night but found K9MRI, K9SLQ and K9FKR and KC3OL again on JT9.  Decoded lots of CQs, but few contacts.  Conditions degraded somewhere around 0700 through sunrise.  Twelve WSPR spots overnight including,  K2BLA (2/-23), K4SV (50/-21), W3LPL (3/-24) and W4CBX (3/27).  K4SV was in early at 0120Z.  Davids station appears to be working well based on the last two sessions.

ZF1EJ –  -29

KL7L no spots.

K9FD 89 spots, -5 (cdx better in the evening)

VK4YB no spots.  First zero spot session in some time.

There was not much 630-meter activity at KB5NJD during this session due to my casual participation in the 160-meter contest.  I did call CQ briefly on 474.5 kHz, receiving “verbal” reports from KR7O via the Internet that the band was experiencing “…fast QSB, 529 at peaks, but only pieces of call. Can’t get entire call.”  I suspect this was one of the challenges of receiving reverse beacon network reports during the evening.  I had none and reports for other station seemed limited as well which may be the result of the reported fast QSB.  I also received an Internet report from an SWL station in Alabama whose call sign I don’t have at this time who indicated that I was RST 569 while calling.  The station was also hearing K9SLQ just above me at RST 579.  Wayne was mostly inaudible here during this particular calling session but was good earlier.  I was off-air this morning with no 630-meter activity.

In the interest of making comparisons, signals on 160-meters during the contest were very strong, particularly before sunset.  By late evening the band was experiencing the same very fast and deep QSB that was experienced on 630-meters, the difference being signal strengths.  There were many co-located stations that were not hearing one another in the same manner as often observed on 630-meters.  I would argue that both bands were very good but the QSB complicated activity on 630-meters more due to weaker signals.  I’m curious to see what happens tonight.

Trans-Atlantic WSPR summary follows:

VE3CIQ -> G8HUH

W1TAG -> F5WK

W4BCX -> EA8BFK

WA3ETD -> F5WK

DH5RAE -> AA1A

DL6TY -> AA1A

DK6XY -> N1BUG, AA1A

G8HUH -> WA3TTS, AA1A, N1BUG

PA0A -> AA1A, KA1R, N1BUG, AB1KW

F5WK -> AA1A, KA1R, N1BUG, N2NOM, VE2PEP, WA3ETD, WA3TTS

AA1A -> DH5RAE, DK6XY, DL/PA0EHG, DL0HT, DL4MAU, EA1FAQ, EA2HB, EA8BFK, F4DTL, F59706, F5WK, F6GEX, G0LUJ, G0LUJ/1, G0MJI, G0VQH, G3WCB, G4CPD, G4ETG, G4ZFQ, G8HUH, LA2XPA, LA3EQ, M0DSZ, M0NKA, M0TAZ, OR7T, PA0EHG, PA0O, PA0RDT, PA0SLT/2, PA3ABK/2, PA3EGH, PA7EY, PI4THT, TF3HZ

Trans-Pacific WSPR summary follows:

NU6O -> ZL2AFP

VK4YB -> JA1PKG, K9FD, KL7L, KR6LA, VA7JX, VE6JY, VE7BDQ

K9FD -> 7L1RLL4, JA1PKG, JE1JDL, JH1INM, JH3XCU, VK4YB, ZL2AFP

 

Hideo, JH3XCU, submitted this link detailing DX -> JA decode totals and DX -> JA S/N peaks for the session, as reported on the Japanese language 472 kHz website.

The WSPRnet activity page reported 164 MF WSPR stations at 0100z.  Regional and continental WSPR breakdowns follow:

North American 24-hour WSPR summary

 

European 24-hour WSPR summary

 

Japanese 24-hour WSPR summary

 

Oceania 24-hour WSPR summary

 

Eden, ZF1EJ, was reported in the Midwest during the evening using JT9 but no QSO’s were reported.  There was an attempted QSO with WB4JWM which succumbed to QSB.  Overnight using WSPR, Eden reported fourteen WSPR stations and he received reports from 63 unique stations.  He shared two-way reports with K9FD.

ZF1EJ session WSPR summary

 

Laurence, KL7L, reported five WSPR stations including VK4YB.  He indicated that he operated in a receive-only capacity during the session and added “…Only “normal” fair on 475 with no real strong sigs.

KL7L session WSPR summary

 

Merv, K9FD (/KH6), reported fourteen WSPR stations. He shared two-way reports with VK4YB and ZF1EJ. Merv received reports from 47 unique stations including 7L1RLL4, JA1PKG, JE1JDL, KL7L, JH1INM, JH3XCU and ZL2AFP.

K9FD session WSPR summary

 


Additions, corrections, clarifications, etc? Send me a message on the Contact page or directly to KB5NJD gmail dot (com)!