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OFF AIR for storms, probably for much of the week if the forecast holds

Solid trans-Atlantic openings favored the East to West paths again; Some average to below average trans-Pacific openings but huge night for KL7L to ‘lower 48’; DK7FC, G3KEV -> FR5DH; Quiet geomagnetic conditions continue and DST improves through this session; W0YSE finds success with WSQ, working VE7BDQ and N1VF

– Posted in: 630 Meter Daily Reports, 630 Meters

The details for February 12, 2017 can be viewed here.

The UTC amateur registration database is here.

Working grids for the first time in 2018? Be sure to upload your logs to LoTW so the 630m operators participating in the 2018 Grid Chase Event can receive credit. Details on LoTW can be viewed here.

The current band plan used on 630 meters can be viewed HERE

WAS operator list detailing stations that are two-way QSO-capable can be viewed here.

Spot stations calling CQ on any mode here on DXSummit and help them find a QSO!

Storms were  present along the Gulf and Atlantic coasts.  A few lightning crashes were heard during the evening but it was never problematic.  High noise levels were reported in the northwestern US in spite of a lack of storm in the area.  Storm activity was more wide spread than in previous sessions across parts of the UK and central Europe into the Mediterranean region.  Central Japan is experiencing isolated lightning-rich storms and storms in Oceania have decreased in eastern Australia while a few storms appeared on the North Island of New Zealand.

11-hour worldwide lightning summary

 

Geomagnetic conditions were quiet. The Bz is pointing to the North this morning and solar wind velocities are averaging near 325 km/s.  DST values are at  positive levels on both presented indicators and are trending upward this morning.

 

 

 

Domestic propagation was better during this session and the band was better earlier in the evening with a lull mid evening followed by improvements on some paths overnight.  Trans-Atlantic openings were very good and QSO’s may have been possible but antenna icing impacted operating for some stations in the Northeast.  Like the previous session, reports favored EU -> NA but storms in Europe may have limited some reporting of North America. Trans-Pacific paths were average to below average.

Reverse beacon network reports follow:

 

Jim, W5EST, submitted the following screen capture of his WSJTx console showing JT9 activity observed at his station in Little Rock, Arkansas:

courtesy W5EST

 

Mal, G3KEV, indicated that he received JT9 reports from W8CDX and N1BUG.  He added that “Some reports last nite were good, stronger than usual TA”

The following stations provided reports of their two-way QSO’s and/or any additional activity that might have occurred during this session (this is not necessarily a complete list – only what was reported!):

Tom, WB4JWM, completed JT9 QSO’s with KC3OL, WB3AVN, WA3ETD, W8CDX and K9SLQ.  Using FT8, Tom worked K0KE and K9KFR.

Keith, K0KE, reported that he “Worked W0YSE and then N4WLO on JT9 for state # 22 on 630m.  Then a quick flurry of activity on FT8, working WB4JWM, KC3OL and K9KFR and then all went quiet..”

John, WA3ETD, completed a JT9 QSO with W8CDX and WB4JWM.

Ted, KC3OL, completed two first-time JT9 QSO’s, one with N4WLO and another with WB3AVN.  He completed a JT9 QSO with WB4JWM and also K9KFR but its not clear whether he was using FT8 or JT9 while working Bob.  I suspect the latter.

Al, K2BLA, reported that he was “Only active this AM. Had rain last night and insulators and ropes on the antenna are soaked. The SWR is elevated and therefore running about half power. Heard 10 and heard by 44; two about 4000 km on WSPR. Lightning noise high due to very slow moving cold front over the Gulf for the last couple of days.”

Neil, W0YSE, successfully worked WSQ with two stations during this session and he offered this report:

“On WSQ last night I was receiving on two systems and also transmitting on one of them. The vertical was used as TX/RX while the second system was using the E-probe. I started picking up soundings from John VE7BDQ shortly after 6 PM (PST) on the E-probe, but I was not in the shack at that time to respond. By the time of our 8 PM sked he was much weaker and I saw him briefly at -18 snr, still only on the E-probe, not on the vertical. The vertical was picking up a lot of QRN. But then Ben N1VF showed up on both systems but weaker on the vertical. Ben and I continued for about an hour and even tried the faster 1 bd speed (about 10 wpm) with good results. After finishing with Ben, John came back in and we had a short QSO before I had to QRT. SNR’s had been between -13 and -20 for most of this activity.

I will be switching my main TX system’s T/R switching so that the E-probe is back on that system again. The Vertical was ok during November, December and probably January, but now it is picking up too much noise and I need to get the E-probe back on the TX/RX system on 630m. I was surprised how clean the waterfall on the second system last night.

On WSPR I was spotted by 40 stations. Here are the DX over 3000 km:

…and I heard these 7 stations: K4SV, K5DNL, KL7L, KR6LA, N1VF, N6PIG, W1IR”

Rik, ON7YD / OR7T, reported that he “…transmitted WSPR this morning for 1 hour (06:30-07:30 UTC and got good results (taken into account my ERP):

Maybe 5-7 UTC is a good timeslot to try transatlantic QSO’s?  It seems also “reasonable” at both sides of the pond (late evening in NA, early morning in EU), nobody has to stay up all night.  Rik is seeking operators in North America to make an attempt.

Ken, K5DNL, operated WSPR during this session, reporting 23 stations including KL7L, DK7FC and G0MRF.  He received reports from 91 unique stations including PA0RDT, G0VQH, G3KEV, G0LUJ, KL7L, GM4AOS and seven Canadian stations.

Stefan, DK7FC, reported a strong night of trans-Atlantic reports, as detailed later in this report.  He indicated that “There were several decodes better than -10 dB by VE9GJ, so the late hours, just before the sunset in EU seems to be the best time for a QSO indeed. It is more healthy anyway to stand up early instead of keeping awake the whole night :-)”

Robert, KR7O, reported:

Very quiet conditions, with only a few static crashes.  Last night I ended up off frequency after testing on QRSS, so only a very limited report Conditions and activity were very low prior to 0300Z.  On JT9, I copied KL7L and K9SLQ.  On WSPR copied KL7L and TC stations W9XA, K4SV and W1IR.

Arliss, W7XU, reported that “Last night was my best night so far for decoding KL7L.’s WSPR signal. Normally I don’t copy his station, but I decoded him 12 times between 0742 and 1312 UTC this morning. Signals ranged from -22 to -27 dB. Sunrise here is at 1330 UTC these days.  My location is in EN13lm, in southeastern South Dakota.

At KB5NJD, reverse beacon reports from WZ7I were early and at levels that were just above the noise floor.  Later calls resulted in no additional reports and listening for historically strong stations like K4EJQ, who was also reported by RBN at the same time, resulted in no signals here in North Texas.  Lightning crashes were not too problematic here.  I am working towards a QRSS QSO in the near-term.

Trans-Atlantic WSPR summary follows:

W4BCX -> F6GEX

K4SV -> GM4OAS

EA4GHB -> AA1A

PA0LSB -> AA1A

DL3NDR -> VE9GJ

EA6FG -> VE9GJ

IW4DXW -> VE9GJ

ON7ZO -> VE9GJ

OR7T -> W1IR, VE9GJ

EA7HPM -> AA1A, VE9GJ

EA7HPM -> AA1A, VE9GJ

F1AFJ -> AA1A, W1IR, VE9GJ

F4DTL -> AA1A, W1IR, VE9GJ

LA8AV -> AA1A, W1IR, VE9GJ

DF2JP -> W1IR, VE9GJ, AA1A

G4GIR -> AA1A, W1IR, VE9GJ, N1BUG

G8HUH -> AA1A, W1VD, N1BUG, VE9GJ

DH5RAE -> VE9GJ, AA1A, W1IR, N1BUG

PA0A -> NO3M/3, VE9GJ, AA1A, W1VD, N1BUG

EA5DOM -> VE9GJ, N1BUG, AA1A, W1IR, N3FL

K5DNL -> G0LUJ, G0VQH, G3KEV, GM4OAS, PA0RDT

G3KEV -> VE9GJ, N1BUG, AA1A, W1IR, W1VD, N3FL

AA1A -> F59706, G4GIR, G8HUH, GM4OAS, LA2XPA, LA3EQ, PA0RDT

W1IR -> DL4RAJ/2, EA2HB, EI8JK, F1AFJ, F59706, F6GEX, G0LUJ, G0MRF/P, G3KEV, GM4OAS, LA3EQ, PA0RDT, PA7EY, PI4THT

DK7FC -> W9RAN, K3SIW/5, SWL/K9, K5DNL, N1DAY, K4LY, K4LY/P, N3FL, N2HQI, VE3CIQ, WA9WTK, W1VD, AA1A, AB1KW, W1IR, VE2PEP, N1BUG, VE9GJ

G0MRF -> AA1A, AB1KW, K3SIW/5, K4SV, K5DNL, KC3OL, N1BUG, N1DAY, N2HQI, N3FL, SWL/K9, VE2PEP, VE3CIQ, VE3IQB, VE9GJ, W1IR, W1TAG, W1VD, W3LPL, W4KZK, WA3TTS, WB3AVN

Trans-Pacific WSPR summary follows:

KL7L -> JA1PKG

VK4YB -> JA1PKG, K1YQP, KJ6MKI, KL7L, KPH, N6KOG, TNUKJPM, VE6XH, W1CK

 

Hideo, JH3XCU, submitted this link detailing DX -> JA WSPR decode totals and DX -> JA WSPR S/N peaks for the session, as reported on the Japanese language 472 kHz website.

 

Regional and continental WSPR breakdowns follow:

North American 24-hour WSPR summary

 

European 24-hour WSPR summary

 

African 24-hour WSPR summary

 

Asiatic Russian 24-hour WSPR summary

 

Japanese 24-hour WSPR summary

 

Oceania 24-hour WSPR summary

 

Pascal, FR5DH, reported WSPR from G3KEV and DK7FC:

FR5DH session WSPR summary

 

Eden, ZF1EJ, operated in a receive-only capacity, reporting six WSPR stations.

ZF1EJ session WSPR summary

 

Laurence, KL7L, had a spectacular night on the path to the eastern areas of the “lower 48”.  Laurence noted some interesting propagation features over the past few sessions:

“Last night fairly early into the night spotlighting to Ken [K5DNL] which then wandered off NW up in to the Midwest.  Spotlight to Ken has been strong for past two night. Early morning E/F faded quite early with No JA resurgence”

Using WSPR, he reported seven stations including K4SV, KE7A, K5DNL and VK4YB.  He received reports from 26 unique stations including JA1PKG, K0OD, K5DNL, KC3OL, SWL/K9, W0DJK, W0JW and W9RAN. He shared two-way reports with K5DNL, KR6LA, N1VF and W0YSE.  Laurence also noted that an upcoming trip to KH6 where he was planning to have 630 meter transmit capabilities won’t happen this time but he plans on being receive-capable as of this report.

KL7L session WSPR summary

 

Roger, VK4YB, reported “Flat conditions. QRN was lower. Outside of VK, only KL7L was visible at times but no decode. Usual three stations decoded my JT9  (KL7L, VE7SL, VE6XH). No progress with antenna repair as I got home late from work.”  Using WSPR, Roger reported one Australian station and he received reports from sixteen unique stations including JA1PKG, K1YQP, KJ6MKI, KL7L, KPH, N6KOG, TNUKJPM, VE6XH and W1CK.

VK4YB session WSPR summary

 

Merv, K9FD (/KH6), was off air during this session.


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