NJDTechnologies

Radio: it's not just a hobby, it's a way of life

Current Operating Frequency and Mode

OFF AIR for storms, probably for much of the week if the forecast holds

Transcontinental openings reported by KR7O in spite of elevated noise; K2BLA reported a number of JT9 QSO’s while K9MRI worked K8TV on CW; W0YSE and VE7VV completed QSOs using CW, GMSK, WSQ and FSQ; Decent trans-Atlantic openings including G0MRF -> YV7MAE, ZF1EJ and ZF1EJ -> LA2XPA; VK4YB reported improved noise conditions while KL7L reported antenna damage from wind

– Posted in: 630 Meter Daily Reports, 630 Meters

The details for January 30, 2017 can be viewed here.

The UTC amateur registration database is here.

Working grids for the first time in 2018? Be sure to upload your logs to LoTW so the 630m operators participating in the 2018 Grid Chase Event can receive credit. Details on LoTW can be viewed here.

The current band plan used on 630 meters can be viewed HERE

WAS operator list detailing stations that are two-way QSO-capable can be viewed here.

Spot stations calling CQ on any mode here on DXSummit and help them find a QSO!

 

A few storms were present in the mid Atlantic region as well as British Columbia and Alberta, Canada with a number  of active systems at sea from the Mexican Pacific coast through the Caribbean and between Florida and New England.  A few isolated storms were present in Europe but did not result in a washout.  Oceania remains inflamed but is better than it has been in days with the bulk of storm activity impacting the northeastern population centers of Australia.  Japan and New Zealand were storm free.

11-hour worldwide lightning summary

 

Geomagnetic conditions reached elevated-quiet levels.  The Bz is pointing slightly to the North this morning and solar wind velocities are averaging near 330 km/s.  DST values remain variable but very near the centerline and mostly at positive levels.

 

 

 

Reverse beacon network reports follow:

 

The following stations provided reports of their two-way QSO’s and/or any additional activity that might have occurred during this session (this is not necessarily a complete list – only what was reported!):

Joe, K9MRI, reported a QSO with K8TV.  It is presumed that this was CW because Ken was reported on the reverse beacon network during the same time frame.

Al, K2BLA, reported that he “Worked WA3ETD, WB4JWM, W9XA, KC3OL, WA9CGZ and W7IUV last night and K0KE, K9SLQ and KC4SIT this morning on JT9. WSPR: heard 22 including EA5DOM and G0MRF and was heard by 69 a record for me. Low noise but some lightning strikes probably from the cold front that rolled through yesterday and still out in the Atlantic.

Neil, W0YSE, operated CW late in the evening transitioning to GMSK, WSQ and finally in tests with Roger, VE7VV.  Neil submitted this receive transcript of Roger’s WSQ transmissions and offered the following comments on the session as well as WSPR statistics from overnight:

“Last night Roger, VE7VV and I had a brief CW QSO o 474.740 kHz.  He was 229 and I was 549.  Robert, KR7O (Madera CA) was also copying me at that time.

In our quest to find a good “chat” mode (other than CW), Roger and I switched to GMSK15 for a bit but had problem dodging the QSB. The “NET” button kept turning itself on after some transmissions so we kept drifting up in frequency. Print was marginal at best this session.

Next we tried WSQCall in chat mode. Copy was pretty good when QSB was not present. WSQCall is slower but we had much better print with it. We were using its fastest speed called “1”, which is about 1 second per lower case character. For this mode we had to move our dial freq to 473.2 since its AF is locked to +1500 hertz on the waterfall. This put us at 474.700 kHz which would be “500” on everyone else’s waterfall.

Next we switched to FSQCall (which I believe was designed for HF and up, not MF/LF). We used the same dial freq  (473.2) and +1500 but I found its default speed too fast to keep up with in the TX buffer. I dropped the speed down to “2” (the lowest in this mode) and continued. Roger was able to copy 100% during much of it until QSB hit again. I am thinking that the propagation was a mixture of ground wave and sky wave which may have affected the QSB problem. Roger is ~200 miles North.

On WSPR this session I was heard by 42 stations, which was up a lot from previous 2 sessions and many were over 3000 km:

…and I heard these 9 wspr-ers: K5DNL, KC4SIT, KR6LA, W1CK, W1IR, W5CGC, W5EMC, W5OXC, W7IUV.

Roger, VE7VV, offered these additional comments on the digital modes that he and W0YSE used during this session:

“…GMSK was hard to tune manually, which was necessary with the freq shifting problem. It had only about a +/- 1 Hz leeway before the AFC would lose lock, at least with the low signal levels we were dealing with. Last night’s experience left me feeling that GMSK is not suitable for marginal skywave conditions on 630m. Earlier tests on groundwave showed good results at low, but stable, signal levels. GMSK is unusual in providing a full character set including support for Japanese.

WSQCall worked the best for us last night, the 1 baud rate is slow but useable and does give the feel of having a chat type free form QSO. It is twice as fast as the old WSQ2. I found that careful lowering of the squelch slider helped to eliminate noise garbage characters. The selective call feature should be interesting to try sometime.
FSQCall did not work for us under the marginal skywave conditions last night. It is at least 6 dB less sensitive, but much faster. For communication using groundwave it has been the best mode I have so far tried over the 100 km path to the mainland. In those tests, we found that the modes slower than the 4.5 baud (default, 30-40 wpm) speed did not in fact provide better print at low s/n’s. The selective call and “pinging” features worked well. This mode appears to offer good potential for emergency communication over groundwave with strong signals.
I’m looking forward to more tests and QSO’s with these chat modes.”

Ken, K5DNL, reported that he operated WSPR through this session, reporting 25 stations and receiving reports from 100 unique stations including KL7L, PA0RDT, ON5KQ, YV7MAE, ZF1EJ, ZF1RC and nine Canadian stations.

Robert, KR7O, reported “Good TC last night in spite of strong noise.  Some regional JT9 activity.  K2BLA, WA9CGZ, K9KFR, K9SLQ and NO3M were copied multiple times throughout the session.  Weaker signals on N/S paths with QSB.  On WSPR, copied TC stations WD8DAS (3/-27), N4WLO (8/-17), N1DAY (2/-27), KC4SIT (70/-20), K4LY (5/-24), K2BLA (4/-16), W3LPL (7/-24), W4BCX (12/-23), W1IR (23/-21).  TC started around 0140Z.

ZF1EJ 1 spot, -26

VK4YB 1 spot, -27″

Trans-Atlantic WSPR summary follows:

ZF1EJ -> LA2XPA

F4DTL -> W1IR

W3LPL -> LA2XPA, LA3EQ

K5DNL -> ON5KQ, PA0RDT

G8HUH -> AA1A, N1BUG

PA3ABK/2 -> AA1A, W1IR

G3KEV ->AA1A, N1BUG, W1IR

EA5DOM -> AA1A. N1BUG, KC4SIT, K2BLA

AA1A -> F59706, LA2XPA, LA3EQ, M0NKA, ON5KQ, OR7T, PA0RDT

W4BCX -> DL4RAJ, DL4RAJ/2, EA8BFK, F59706, LA2XPA, LA3EQ, PA7EY

G0MRF -> AA1A, AB1KW, K2BLA, K4RCG, KA1R, N1BUG, N2BJW, N3FL, VE2PEP, VE3CIQ, W1IR, WA3TTS, YV7MAE, ZF1EJ

W1IR -> DH5RAE, DK6UG, DK7FC, DL4RAJ, DL4RAJ/2, EA2HB, F59706, G3KEV, G4ZFQ, GM3YXM, LA2XPA, LA3EQ, LA3JJ, M0LMH, M0NKA, ON5KQ, OR7T, PA0EHG, PA0LSB, PA0RDT, PA3ABK/2, PA7EY

Trans-Pacific WSPR summary follows:

VK4YB -> JA1PKG, JA3TVF, KL7L

 

Hideo, JH3XCU, submitted this link detailing DX -> JA WSPR decode totals and DX -> JA WSPR S/N peaks for the session, as reported on the Japanese language 472 kHz website.

 

Regional and continental WSPR breakdowns follow:

North American 24-hour WSPR summary

 

South American 24-hour WSPR summary

 

European 24-hour WSPR summary

 

Asiatic Russian 24-hour WSPR summary

 

Japanese 24-hour WSPR summary

 

Oceania 24-hour WSPR summary

 

Eden, ZF1EJ, reported nineteen WSPR stations including G0MRF and he received reports from 57 unique stations including LA2XPA and YV7MAE.

ZF1EJ session WSPR summary

 

Roger, ZF1RC, reported twelve WSPR stations.

ZF1RC session WSPR summary

 

Martin, YV7MAE, reported twelve WSPR stations including G0MRF and W7IUV.

YV7MAE session WSPR summary

 

Roger, VK4YB, indicated that it was “Surprising low noise here for a change. Lots of blue on the Elecraft P3 waterall but not a single WSPR or JT9 decode, local or DX. Reports from North America were generally weaker.”  Roger received reports from fifteen unique stations including JA1PKG, JA3TVF and KL7L.

VK4YB session WSPR summary

 

Laurence, KL7L, reported damage to his antenna system due to very high winds.  Subsequently he was in “receive only” capacity overnight as high winds persist.  He reported five WSPR stations.  He also reported VE7SL and K0KE using JT9 stations:

0351 -22  1.5 1088 @  CQ VE7SL CN88

1114 -27  0.4 10199 @  CQ K0KE DM79

1142 -26  0.5  761 @  N9RU K0KE

KL7L session WSPR summary

 

Merv, K9FD (/KH6), was off air during this session.


Additions, corrections, clarifications, etc? Send me a message on the Contact page or directly to KB5NJD gmail dot (com)!