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OFF AIR for storms, probably for much of the week if the forecast holds

Good session in spite of deep QSB as geomagnetic field flirts with unsettled levels; Trans-Atlantic openings continue to stretch into the Caribbean and South America; W5EST presents: ”Searching for Post-Sunrise 630m SNR Peaks: K5DNL-w5est, 430km”

– Posted in: 630 Meter Daily Reports, 630 Meters

The details for January 20, 2017 can be viewed here.

The UTC amateur registration database is here.

Working grids for the first time in 2018? Be sure to upload your logs to LoTW so the 630m operators participating in the 2018 Grid Chase Event can receive credit. Details on LoTW can be viewed here.

The current band plan used on 630 meters can be viewed HERE

WAS operator list detailing stations that are two-way QSO-capable can be viewed here.

Spot stations calling CQ on any mode here on DXSummit and help them find a Q

 

A few storms persist in the southwestern US in addition to Gulf of Mexico.  A few overnight storms were present in central Europe include a cluster that continue this morning in the southeastern region.  Isolated storms returned to Japan but the eastern coast of Australia is free of lightning for the moment.  I expect that listening in Oceania remains poor.

11-hour worldwide lightning summary

 

Geomagnetic conditions remain at elevated quiet levels. The Bz is near unity this morning and solar wind velocities  are averaging near 390 km/s. DST values remain near the centerline but are showing more variability than recent sessions.

 

 

 

Propagation was really very good for stations that had the patience to wait out extremely deep QSB. Transcontinental openings, while rare for the session, did manifest, resulting in long QSO’s and WSPR reports during the evening.  Trans-Atlantic openings were again very strong.  Trans-Pacific openings were very good as well.

Reverse beacon network reports follow:

 

Jim, W5EST, submitted the following screen captures of his WSJTx console showing JT9 activity observed at his station in Little Rock, Arkansas:

courtesy W5EST

 

The following stations provided reports of their two-way QSO’s and/or any additional activity that might have occurred during this session (this is not necessarily a complete list – only what was reported!):

John, WA3ETD, completed JT9 QSO’s with VE3CIQ and K8TV.

Bob, K9KFR, completed a CW QSO with K8RYU.

Ted, KC3OL, completed a JT9 QSO with K5DNL and KB5NJD.

Keith, K0KE, completed JT9 QSO’s with N1BUG and NU6O.

Neil, W0YSE, reported that  he “…had two JT9 Q’s last night. First I saw Joe NU60 putting out several CQs. I figured he was trying to be seen by Eric NO3M (via “chat”) so I held off calling him for awhile. While in QSO with Joe, I saw Ken K5DNL calling me a bit lower in frequency, so I double clicked on his decode and wsjt-x automatically had me sending him his report. Ken came back with an “RRR” after a “non-decode” sequence, but I had not decoded his report. I think QSB probably played a part in this result. He came back with a “73” so I guess it is a legit contact. 

Other JT9-ers seen on my screen this AM were VE7SL, W7IUV, K0KE, KR7O and KL7L (AK, with best of -12 ).

On WSPR my TX results were about the same as the previous session (minus Eden ZF1EJ). I was heard by 36, and several on the east coast, which is always a treat to see. Here are the most distant.”

W0YSE WSPR distributions (courtesy W0YSE)

 

Al, K2BLA,  reported that he “Worked ZF1EJ and K5DNL this AM on JT9 with good signals. On WSPR: heard 21 including G0MRF. Heard by 49. Running slightly reduced power, -1dB, as it is still cold here in Central FL but not as bad as it was the last few days. Something causes a reduction in my indicated field intensity when the temperature gets to mid-20’s and low 30’s. Don’t know why, but it happens. Relatively low noise.”

Larry, W7IUV, reported CW from KB5NJD and K4EJQ during the early evening and completed a JT9 QSO with KB5NJD who he continued to report for quite some time in spite of QSB.

Robert, KR7O, indicated that there was no significant daytime openings reported by his station during this session.  He supplied the following comments and statistics:

Lightning crashes and very noisy here last night, but there was still a lot JT9 activity and QSOs noted.  Heard 12, including K5DNL, KB5NJD, WA9CGZ, K2BLA and KL7L.  Called WA9CGZ for a while with no luck.  On WSPR I copied 18, including TC stations N4WLO (2/-28), K2BLA (2/-18), W3LPL (30/-19), VE3CIQ (5/-26), W1IR (38/-19), N1BUG (5/-25) and ZF1EJ.  W1IR was in/out starting around 04Z, but after 06Z, he and W3LPL were in most of the time.  W3LPL disappeared around 09Z and W1IR at 10Z.  VE3CIQ copied for the first time in some time, reflecting good conditions to the NE.

ZF1EJ 4 spots, -24

KL7L 64 spots, -3 (many single digit reports this session)

K9FD 1 spot, -28

VK4YB 2 spots, -28

JB, VE3EAR, reported that he monitored JT9 again overnight, adding a number of stations to the list that he decoded in the previous session, including KB5NJD, W7IUV, N1BUG, K5DNL and VE3CIQ.

Fred, K1YQP, reported  that he “…copied VK4YB on JT-9 multiple times early this morning…

Hideo, JH3XCU, submitted this image of JT9 CQ’s by VK4YB:

courtesy JH3XCU

 

This was a fun session at KB5NJD.  I was playing catch up on some work so I began the session listening for CW.  K4EJQ was loud much earlier than normal as he called CQ.  I moved on to JT9 at some point, completed QSO’s with WB4JWM, W7IUV, K9SLQ, N1BUG and KC3OL.  It was nice to work N1BUG for a new state (Maine).  It took a bit of patience but we got it done.  Wayne, K9SLQ, submitted this screen capture of my signal that apparently peaked around -9 dB S/N just after our QSO:

courtesy K9SLQ

 

I was looking for Joe, NU6O, but only saw a few smudges in the waterfall where his signal was reported to be.   He was hearing me at times as well.  Larry, W7IUV, reported my CQ at 0123z at RST 339 on a dip while Robert, KR7O, reported my final CQ on CW for the night a RST 559 at 0331z.

Trans-Atlantic WSPR summary follows:

F1AFJ -> W1IR

F6GEX -> W1IR

DC0DX -> W1IR, KA1R

ZF1EJ -> G0LUJ, LA2XPA

K5DNL -> EA8BFK, F1AFJ

W3LPL -> EA8BFK, G0LUJ, LA2XPA

W4BCX -> EA8BFK, LA2XPA, LA3EQ

GM3YXM -> N1BUG, NO3M, VE1YY, W1IR

PA0A -> AA1A, AB1KW, N1BUG, NO3M, VE1YY

EA5DOM -> NO3M, N1BUG, VE1YY, W1IR, AB1KW, AA1A, KA1R

AA1A -> F1AFJ, F59706, G0IDE, G0LUJ, G4ZFQ, GM3YXM, LA2XPA, LA3EQ, M0NKA, PA0O, PA0PJE, PA0RDT

G0MRF -> AA1A, AB1KW, AE2EA, K2BLA, K4LY, KA1R, N1BUG, N2HQI, N3FL, NC8W, NO3M, VE1YY, VE2PEP, VE3CIQ, W1IR, W1XP, W3LPL, W4BCX, WA3TTS, WB3AVN

W1IR -> DH5RAE, DL-SWL, DL4RAJ, DL4RAJ/2, EA8BFK, F1AFJ, F59706, G0IDE, G0LUJ, G3WCB, G4ZFQ, GM3YXM, LA2XPA, LA3EQ, M0NKA, M0TAZ, OR7T, PA0EHG, PA0O, PA0PJE, PA0RDT

N1BUG -> DH5RAE, DL-SWL, DL4RAJ, DL4RAJ/2, EA8BFK, F1AFJ, F59706, F6GEX, G0IDE, G0LUJ, G3WCB, G4ZFQ, GM3YXM, LA2XPA, LA3EQ, M0NKA, ON5TA, OR7T, PA0A, PA0EHG, PA0O, PA0PJE, PA0RDT

Trans-Pacific WSPR summary follows:

KL7L -> JA1PKG, JA3TVF, JE1JDL, JH3XCU, TNUKJPM, VK4YB

VK4YB -> JA1PKG, JA3TVF, K1YQP, K9FD, KJ6MKI, KK6EEW, KL7L, KPH, KR6LA, KR7O, NU6O, TNUKJPM, VE6JY, VE6XH

 Hideo, JH3XCU, submitted this link detailing DX -> JA WSPR decode totals and DX -> JA WSPR S/N peaks for the session, as reported on the Japanese language 472 kHz website.

 

Regional and continental WSPR breakdowns follow:

North American 24-hour WSPR summary

 

South American 24-hour WSPR summary

 

European 24-hour WSPR summary

 

Japanese 24-hour WSPR summary

 

Indonesian 24-hour WSPR summary

 

Oceania 24-hour WSPR summary

 

Eden, ZF1EJ, completed a JT9 QSO with K2BLA.  Overnight, Eden reported seventeen WSPR stations including G0MRF and he received reports from 49 unique stations including LA2XPA and G0LUJ.

ZF1EJ session WSPR summary

 

Martin, YV7MAE, reported eleven WSPR stations including EA5DOM and G0MRF.

YV7MAE session WSPR summary

 

Laurence, KL7L, observed at 0800z,  “Blue Green Auroral arc on the horizon – didnt want to see that this evening….”  This morning he indicated that he was not seeing any auroral glow.  He reported two JT9 signals in the late evening:

0543 -22  0.1 1328 @  CQ NU6O CN70

0556 -24  0.4 1284 @  K5DNL W0YSE 73

This morning Laurence indicated that he received VK4YB’s JT9 for about an hour, with this report as the last:

1326 -22  0.3 1100 @  CQ VK4YB QG62

Laurence reported seven WSPR stations and he received reports from 27 unique stations including JA1PKG, JA3TVF, JE1JDL, JH3XCU and TNUKJPM. He shared two-way reports with KA7OEI, KR6LA, NU6O, VK4YB, W0YSE and W7IUV.

KL7L session WSPR summary

 

Merv, K9FD (/KH6), was only briefly QRV during this session due to a blown fuse on his PA which has since been repaired.  He reported seven WSPR stations including VK4YB. He shared two-way reports with KR6LA and NU6O.  Merv received reports from five unique stations.

KL7L session WSPR summary

 

Jim, W5EST, presents, “Searching for Post-Sunrise 630m SNR Peaks: K5DNL-w5est, 430km“:

“The post-SR regime, occupies the first hour after eastward station’s local sunrise.  Do post-SR SNR peaks or “bumps” happen this winter time of year?  Yes, they do indeed: 15-20dB!

Today’s illustration shows individual post-SR bump instances on three out of four mornings when I had the WSPR decoder running continually to show us the K5DNL signal interestingly.  (Time proceeds right to left.)  The instances span a month beginning just around solstice: Dec. 19, Dec. 31, Jan. 1, and Jan. 16.  For each day I show the bump time (red arrow), if any ,and the East station SR (E.SR, w5est, brown arrow).  Further, the approximate time (black arrow) of D-region exposure to solar ionizing radiation is estimated, by applying graphs from the Jan. 11 blog post: http://njdtechnologies.net/011118/

On the three mornings when post-SR bumps showed up, they all occurred about the same time—1348-1350z.  Compared to next-earlier post-SR trough SNR, all of them peaked up 15dB. The morning of Dec. 31, the bump peaked 20dB up and remained at least 10dB up for about 20 minutes.

630m nighttime on this 430km path featured only some variations straying outside the usual 10dB range of SNRs typical of WSPR decoder signal averaging across 2 minutes of phasing QSB.  For good measure, the SNR graphs cover full nights.   One noticeable departure down about 15 dB occurred well before sunup 12/31/17 (points #73-#75) and then partially recovered.

A nearly complete sequence of daytime SNRs on Jan. 2 shows a bowl-shaped SNR pattern descending about 30 dB into morning and symmetrically ascending in late afternoon.   Daytime SNRs stayed in a somewhat more confined range down near decoder threshold threshold when they did decode.   However, I’ve noticed some 10dB daytime upswings in K5DNL SNR during 630m daytimes on occasional days.

You might characterize as “pre-SS bump” the SNR peak to -11 dB at point #185, 2232z on Dec. 18 before nightfall turned Zulu date over to 12/19.  SS in AR 2301z , in OK 2318z   This brief pre-SS SNR departure lasted just a few minutes.

Do JT9 opportunities during such SNR excursions happen on longer 630m paths than the 430km path illustrated here?  Tell us your post-SR and pre-SS JT9 operating experiences as this wintertime season continues!  TU & GL on 630m!”


Additions, corrections, clarifications, etc? Send me a message on the Contact page or directly to KB5NJD gmail dot (com)!