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Current Operating Frequency and Mode

OFF AIR for storms, probably for much of the week if the forecast holds

Better domestic session particularly in the East with slower QSB that lacked the depth of previous sessions; Many indicate good transcontinental openings; W4KZK makes first QSO’s using JT9; Strong trans-Atlantic openings persist while path between JA and KH6, KL7, and VK improves again; W5EST presents: ”Compare Deep Decode WSJT-X vs. Waterfall of WSPR-X”

– Posted in: 630 Meter Daily Reports, 630 Meters

The details for January 17, 2017 can be viewed here.

The UTC amateur registration database is here.

Working grids for the first time in 2018? Be sure to upload your logs to LoTW so the 630m operators participating in the 2018 Grid Chase Event can receive credit. Details on LoTW can be viewed here.

The current band plan used on 630 meters can be viewed HERE

WAS operator list detailing stations that are two-way QSO-capable can be viewed here.

Spot stations calling CQ on any mode here on DXSummit and help them find a Q

 

There were a few storms on the US/Canadian border in the Pacific Northwest as well as the Southeastern US during the evening.  Central America remains quite active and those storms may have been heard by a few stations in the southern US this morning.  Europe is ablaze with storms once again, ranging from Great Britain to Greece.  Japan is flirting with storms along with southeastern coast while the storms impacting Oceania are very similar to the previous session where the populations centers in the East and South are mostly lightning free while storms in the Sea of Tasman plague the south island of New Zealand.

11-hour worldwide lightning summary

 

Geomagnetic conditions were quiet to very quiet.  The Bz is pointing slightly to the South this morning and solar wind velocities are averaging near 340 km/s.  DST values remain very stable, at or slightly above the center line.

 

 

 

Reverse beacon network reports follow:

 

Jim, W5EST, submitted the following screen captures of his WSJTx console showing JT9 activity observed at his station in Little Rock, Arkansas:

courtesy W5EST

 

The following stations provided reports of their two-way QSO’s and/or any additional activity that might have occurred during this session (this is not necessarily a complete list – only what was reported!):

Wayne, K9SLQ, completed a JT9 QSO with W4KZK, who was reported for the first time during this session.  Wayne’s report allowed several stations to work Charles for a new station and new grid during the evening.

Joe, K9MRI, completed JT9 QSO’s with W4KZK and K2BLA.

Charles, W4KZK, completed JT9 QSO’s with K9SLQ, K9MRI and KB5NJD.

Thomas, N9RU, completed a JT9 QSO with W3XY.

Ted, KC3OL, completed a JT9 QSO with K3MF, best at -23 dB S/N.

Al, K2BLA, reported that he “Worked K9KFR, K9MRI and KB5NJD all with good signals last night. Also worked W4KZK for a new one overall and a new 2018 grid. Nothing heard on JT9 this AM. WSPR: heard by 55 nothing outside NA. Heard 18 including G0MRF. Was hearing lightning crashes this AM but can’t see any activity on Blitzortung. No idea where it is coming from. Otherwise low noise.

Fred, K1YQP/6, reporting from near Sacramento, indicated that he was evaluating the receive performance of a new Icom 7100.  He reported JT9 from KJ6KO, K0KE, KL7L, VE7CNF and NO3M during the evening.  He added that, using WSPR, he reported “…transcontinental decodes of W1IR and K3LPL, as well as strong Trans-Pac decodes of KL7L and K9FD.”  He hopes to be transmitting soon.

Robert, KR7O, reported “Quiet and slightly improved conditions, but little activity and only spotty TC receptions.  On JT9, copied K5DNL and  KB5NJD working W4KZK (not copied).  K9KFR also copied calling KZK.  KL7L was copied from 0451Z with  KL7L and NO3M copied trading CQs around 0538-0630Z or so.  On WSPR I was heard by 14 and heard 20, including W4KZK (-28), K2BLA (2/-19), W3LPL (5/-23), W4BCX (2/-25), W1IR (13/-22) and ZF1EJ.

ZF1EJ 3 spots, -25

KL7L  47 spots, -14

K9FD 99 spots, -4

VK4YB 1 spot, -24

Neil, W0YSE, reported that overnight, he decoded JT9 from:

“K0KE with a best of -20, VE7SL (-4), KL7L appeared off and on thru-out the night (-22), tons of decodes of NO3M (-20), and VE7CNF (+1). 

On WSPR, I was heard by 35. These are the best DX of the session:

…and I heard these WSPR stations: 

AH6EZ, K5DNL, K9FD, KA7OEI, KL7L, KR6LA, KR7O, VA7MM, VE7BDQ, W1IR, W7IUV.

Ken, K5DNL, operated WSPR overnight and indicated that “Running 50W TPO, never though we cud reach EU with low power.”  He reported 22 stations and received reports from 91 unique stations including KL7L, G0LUJ,  F59706, F6GEX,  K9FD (/KH6),  EA8BFK and eleven Canadian stations.

I worked a new station during the evening here at KB5NJD.  W4KZK, located in Virginia, was reported to be QRV using JT9 by K9SLQ so I transitioned from CW to JT9 and was pleased to get this station in the log for a new one.  K4EJQ was heard on CW but he was weaker than normal through the evening as he made calls.  I did not make it on the air this morning due to a headache but did monitor JT9 pre-sunrise, reporting KC3OL at CW levels.  I had hopes of seeing KL7L.  I had a few evening reverse beacon network reports at decent levels but completed no additional CW QSO’s.

Trans-Atlantic WSPR summary follows:

ZF1EJ -> LA2XPA

EA1FBU -> AA1A

DC0DX -> W1IR

DH5RAE -> W1IR

DL6TY -> W1IR, AA1A

W4BCX -> EA8BFK, G0LUJ, LA2XPA

F1AFJ -> N1BUG, AA1A, W1IR

K5DNL -> EA8BFK, F59706, F6GEX, G0LUJ

AA1A -> EA2HB, F1AFJ, F6GEX, G0LUJ, LA2XPA, M0NKA

W1IR -> EA2HB, EA5KK, F1AFJ, F4DTL, F59706, F6GEX, G0LUJ, G4KPX, G4ZFQ, LA2XPA, M0NKA, PA0RDT, PA3ABK/2

G0MRF -> AB1KW, AE2EA, K2BLA K4RCG, K4RCG/SDR1, K5DNL, KA1MDA, KA1R, KK1W, N1BUG, N2HQI, N3FL, N9JL, N9LYE, VE1YY, VE2PEP, VE3CIQ, W1IR, W1XP2, W3LPL, W4BCX, W4KZK, WB3AVN

Trans-Pacific WSPR summary follows:

KL7L -> JA1PKG

K9FD -> JA1PKG, JA3TVF, JE1JDL, KL7L, VK4YB, ZF1EJ

VK4YB -> JA1PKG, JA3TVF, K9FD, KK6EEW, KPH, KR6LA, KR7O, VE6JY, VE7BDQ

 

Hideo, JH3XCU, submitted this link detailing DX -> JA WSPR decode totals and DX -> JA WSPR S/N peaks for the session, as reported on the Japanese language 472 kHz website.

 

Regional and continental WSPR breakdowns follow:

North American 24-hour WSPR summary

 

European 24-hour WSPR summary

 

Asiatic Russian 24-hour WSPR summary

 

Japanese 24-hour WSPR summary

 

Oceania 24-hour WSPR summary

 

Eden, ZF1EJ, reported fifteen WSPR stations and he received reports from 59 unique stations including LA2XPA.  He shared two-way WSPR reports with K9FD.

ZF1EJ session WSPR summary

 

Laurence, KL7L, operated JT9 for a bit overnight and this morning in hopes of catching a station in the lower-48.  NO3M was actively seeking his signal but Laurence indicated that skywave seemed poor during the evening and at the time that both stations were present.  I feel pretty confident that these two will complete a QSO soon.  Laurence also indicated that elevated temperatures resulted in a poor antenna match, leaving him as much as 1.5 dB down from normal.  Using WSPR, Laurence reported nine stations and he received reports from nineteen unique stations including JA1PKG. He shared two-way reports with K9FD, KA7OEI, KR6LA, VA7MM, VE7BDQ and W0YSE.

KL7L session WSPR summary

 

Merv, K9FD (/KH6), reported thirteen WSPR stations. He shared two-way reports with K5DNL, KA7OEI, KL7L, KR6LA, VA7MM, VE7BDQ, VK4YB, W0YSE, W1IR and ZF1EJ.  Merv received reports from 39 unique stations including JA1PKG, JA3TVF, and JE1JDL.

K9FD session WSPR summary

 

Jim, W5EST, presents, “COMPARE ‘DEEP DECODE’ WSJT-X vs. WATERFALL OF WSPR-X”:

“Yesterday, I wondered if “Deep” search under the “Decode” pulldown of WSJT-X may already detect down to the limit of what the WSPR-X waterfall can display.  WSPR-X provides the highest quality WSPR waterfall I’ve seen.   Bottom line: WSPR-X waterfall outperforms even “Deep” Decode.

The last screenshot blogged at http://njdtechnologies.net/112717/  showed 15 decodes from midday WSJT-X “Deep” Decode WSPR mode and only 11 decodes from WSPR-X WSPR mode. (K5DNL-w5est, 430 km, 1712-1832z 11/25/17).   WSJT-X Deep Decode failed to decode three visible WSPR bars on the WSPR-X waterfall that day (1740, 1745, 1814z).

Today’s illustrations take this question a step further by repeating the shootout under lower noise and higher artificially added noise conditions.   K5DNL daytime WSPR bars were again employed yesterday afternoon 1/16/18.

In the first illustration, 1912-1944z, favorable SNR delivered six consecutive decodes at both decoders. I artificially increased noise a step to reduce the SNR. Between 1948-2058z, WSJT-X “Deep” Decode produced 14 decodes out of 16 possible, a 40% advantage over WSPR-X’s 10 decodes.  I surmise from the reported SNRs that the WSJT-X decoder’s SNR threshold is about the same as WSPR-X decoder’s SNR threshold. What’s different is the WSJT-X “Deep” decode percentage near that SNR threshold is higher than for the WSPR-X decode percentage near the same threshold.

In the second illustration, I increased the noise still further and ran the test 2100z-2206z same afternoon. Out of 12 bars, all visible on the WSPR-X waterfall, WSJT-X “Deep” Decode and the WSPR-X each decoded onlytwo.  (WSJT-X: 2116, 2120z. WSPR-X: 2120, 2126z.)

That test persuades me that WSPR-X waterfall repeatedly provides visibility of bars at SNRs below the capabilities of either the “Deep” decode of WSJT-X or the decoder of WSPR-X.  Presumably, software could auto-decode WSPR2 directly from the pixel output that drives the WSPR-X waterfall.

TU & GL on 630m!”

click to enlarge

 

click to enlarge

 


Additions, corrections, clarifications, etc? Send me a message on the Contact page or directly to KB5NJD gmail dot (com)!