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OFF AIR for storms, probably for much of the week if the forecast holds

More of the same for North America with strong trans-Atlantic openings and numerous good domestic openings that experienced strong QSB; Trans-Pacific openings remain average; W5EST presents: ”Auto-Decode WSPR from its Decoder Waterfall”

– Posted in: 630 Meter Daily Reports, 630 Meters

The details for January 16, 2017 can be viewed here.

The UTC amateur registration database is here.

Working grids for the first time in 2018? Be sure to upload your logs to LoTW so the 630m operators participating in the 2018 Grid Chase Event can receive credit. Details on LoTW can be viewed here.

The current band plan used on 630 meters can be viewed HERE

WAS operator list detailing stations that are two-way QSO-capable can be viewed here.

Spot stations calling CQ on any mode here on DXSummit and help them find a Q

 

North America was again free from lightning but parts of the West coast were near lightning-rich storms.  Moderate lightning crashes were reported this morning in southern California.  A few strikes were present once again across the Caribbean into the Atlantic.  Reports from New England suggest that the noise level in that area was low.  It was quiet in the south central US during the evening in spite of precipitation.    Stormy conditions have returned to northern Europe and ranging as far south as the southeastern Mediterranean.  Japan was storm free.  Oceania remains active but the eastern and southern coast of Australia was clear.  The south island  of New Zealand into the Sea of Tasman was dotted with a few storms.

11-hour worldwide lightning summary

 

Geomagnetic conditions were quiet. The Bz is pointing to the South this morning and solar wind velocities are averaging near 460 km/s. DST values remain very consistent through this session, riding the centerline.

 

 

 

Deep QSB was a major feature reported by a number of stations during this session.

Reverse beacon network reports follow:

 

Jim, W5EST, submitted the following screen capture of his WSJTx console showing JT9 activity observed at his station in Little Rock, Arkansas:

courtesy W5EST

 

The following stations provided reports of their two-way QSO’s and/or any additional activity that might have occurred during this session (this is not necessarily a complete list – only what was reported!):

John, WA3ETD, reported a strong session, completing CW QSO’s with WB4JWM, K2BLA, K9SLQ, N9RU, W9XA and NO3M.

Tom, WB4JWM, reported JT9 QSO’s with K9SLQ, WA1OJN and WA3ETD.

Al, K2BLA, indicated that he worked WA3ETD, W3XY, W9XA and NO3M using JT9, noting that “the last two are new 2018 grids.”   Using WSPR Al reported 23 stations including G0MRF and he received reports from 45 unique stations.

Robert, KR7O, reported that “Conditions improving slightly, but still pretty poor.  Woke up early and found lightning crashes at 1130Z.  Not very much JT9 activity in the evening, but copied and called WA9CGZ for some time, but no response.  Copied/called K2BLA (-24) around 1130Z, but no luck either.  NO3M only -25 to -26, so not very promising AM cdx.  On WSPR, copied by 13 western stations only.  Copied 17, including TC stations N1DAY (3/-26), K2BLA (-20), W4BCX (-23), W1IR (12/-23), ZF1EJ.

ZF1EJ 5 spots, -25

K9FD 93 spots, -4

VK4YB 2 spots, -24

Ken, K5DNL, operated only WSPR during this session, reporting 24 stations.  He received reports from 85 unique stations including KL7L,  LA2XPA,  F59706,  F1AFJ,  K9FD (/KH6),  ZF1EJ and eight Canadian stations.

Trans-Atlantic WSPR summary follows:

ZF1EJ -> LA2XPA

N1DAY -> LA2XPA

EA7HPM -> AA1A

DF2JP -> W1IR

DH5RAE -> W1IR

DL6TY -> W1IR

EA6FG -> W1IR

EA7HPM -> W1IR

F4DTL -> AA1A, W1IR

PA3ABK/2 -> N1BUG, W1IR

K5DNL -> F1AFJ, F59706, LA2XPA

F1AFJ -> AA1A, N1BUG, W1IR

W4BCX -> EA2HB, EA8BFK, F1AFJ, F59706, LA2XPA

AA1A -> EA2HB, EA8BFK, F1AFJ, F59706, F6GEX, G0LUJ, LA2XPA, M0NKA, PA0O, PA0RDT

G0MRF -> AA1A, AE2EA, K2BLA, K4RCG/SDR, K9AN, KA1R, N1BUG, N1DAY, N2HQI, N3FL, VE3CIQ, W1IR, W4KZK, WB3AVN, ZF1EJ

W1IR -> DH5RAE, DK7FC, DL1TT, DL4RAJ, DL4RAJ/2, EA2HB, EA5KK, EA8BFK, F1AFJ, F59706, F5WK, F6GEX, G0LUJ, G4ETG, G4KPX, G4ZFQ, G8JFX, LA2XPA, M0NKA, M0TAZ, PA0EHG, PA0O, PA0RDT, PA3ABK/2, PA7EY

Trans-Pacific WSPR summary follows:

K9FD -> JA1PKG, JH3XCU, JA3TVF, JE1JDL, KL7L, VK2XGJ, VK3ALZ, VK4YB, ZF1EJ

VK4YB -> JA1PKG, JA3TVF, K9FD, KJ6MKI, KK6EEW, KL7L, KPH, KR6LA, KR7O, VA7MM, VE6JY, VE7BDQ, VE7CA

 

Hideo, JH3XCU, submitted this link detailing DX -> JA WSPR decode totals and DX -> JA WSPR S/N peaks for the session, as reported on the Japanese language 472 kHz website.

 

Regional and continental WSPR breakdowns follow:

North American 24-hour WSPR summary

 

European 24-hour WSPR summary

 

Asiatic Russian 24-hour WSPR summary

 

Japanese 24-hour WSPR summary

 

Chinese 24-hour WSPR summary

 

Oceania 24-hour WSPR summary

 

Eden, ZF1EJ, reported eighteen WSPR stations including G0MRF and he received reports from 53 unique stations including LA2XPA.  He shared two-way WSPR reports with K9FD.

ZF1EJ session WSPR summary

 

Laurence, KL7L, reported seven WSPR stations including VK4YB and K9FD.  He indicated at 0700z that the band sounded dead in Alaska.

KL7L session WSPR summary

 

Merv, K9FD (/KH6), reported ten WSPR stations. He shared two-way reports with K5DNL, KA7OEI, KR6LA, KR7O, VA7MM, VE7BDQ, VK4YB, W0YSE, W1IR, and ZF1EJ.  Merv received reports from forty unique stations including JA1PKG, JH3XCU, JE1JDL, JA3TVF, KL7L, VK2XGJ and  VK3ALZ.

K9FD session WSPR summary

 

Jim, W5EST, presents, “AUTO-DECODE WSPR2 FROM ITS DECODER WATERFALL”:

“Some weeks ago, the 11/27/17 blog did a shootout between WSPR-X and WSJT-X waterfalls.  I could see WSPR bars that the WSPR-X decoder did not decode, see also the 11/28/17 blog. WSPR-X provides the highest quality WSPR waterfall I’ve seen.

That inspired the question, “How could one provide auto-detection from the WSPR-X waterfall itself?”  Here’s a procedure description to answer that question.   Recognizing the difficulty of ever getting it adopted and implemented for a WSPR app, I’m at least describing it for what it’s worth.  Also, “Deep Search” under the “Decode” pulldown of WSJT-X may already detect down to the limit of what the WSPR-X waterfall can display. See what you think at your station’s setup. (WSPR-X lacks “Deep Search.”) Anyhow, on the 2200m/630m bands, we need to detect signals still more deeply buried in noise than either WSPR-X or WSJT-X currently can decode.

Here goes: Provide a user-activation button on the WSPR decoder to start the following analysis of waterfall pixels on the WSPR-X waterfall display.  The station RX setup beforehand should provide uniform faint band noise “snow” across the WSPR band on the waterfall.   For the usual case of transmit stations running TxPct 50% or less, the procedure should work, especially in lower-noise daytimes when stations are likely also spread out more than a few Hertz from each other.

Today’s illustration applies the below auto-detection procedure to K5DNL-w5est WSPR bars. Ten K5DNL WSPR bars are visible and pointed out by the white left-arrows. Two up-arrows indicate the K5DNL frequency.  All ten bars were probably near or below decode threshold, because all ten bars failed to decode on a winter afternoon Jan. 8, 2018.   The procedure scans frequency Hertz by Hertz horizontally across each time slot using a cross-shaped configuration of nine pixel-counting rectangles, illustrated by three “cross” instances.

When the center rectangle encloses significantly more signal pixels than either of the two flanking triplets of rectangles, and ditto for at least one same frequency rectangle directly above or below the center rectangle, then analysis declares a “Detect” event.  “No-detect” events that fail to pass the test are also illustrated.   Next below, I list a more detailed layout of the procedure in Phases.

PHASE 0

–Develop a stored set of WSPR stations and their frequencies as decoded conventionally previous night(s).

— Develop a calibration of SNR vs. ratio of center-rectangle pixels to least-average in the flanking triplets given test signal strength in the center rectangle of the “cross” and given test-delivered noise level across the WSPR band.

PHASE 1

–Now, store a current raw waterfall covering an hour at a time of the 200 KHz 2200m or 630m WSPR band as actually received over the air.

–Analyze the pixels of that stored waterfall by frequency-scanning across each 2 minute time slot. Or analyze the pixels with each center frequency of the “cross” selected from the stored set of stations and frequencies from Phase 0.

— At the center frequency of the cross, figure the lesser  of the pixel intensities for one preceding and succeeding time slot that does not get a decode.

–If the ratio of the center-rectangle pixel intensities to the lesser pixel intensities fails to exceed a preset value, loop back and try another center frequency, otherwise continue at same center frequency.

—-In a triplet of flanking 5-Hertz slot widths at +/-5Hz, +/-10Hz, +/-15Hz either side of the center frequency 0Hz, find the least average of pixel intensities as a proxy for noise level.  (One or more other stations TXing in those slots would be counted as noise, so least-average makes this mistake less likely.)  Declare a “Detect” signal event if no conventional decode has occurred at this center frequency and yet the ratio of the center-rectangle pixel intensities to least-average in the flanking triplets exceeds a predetermined value.

–Given Phase 0 calibration of SNR vs. such ratio, compute a SNR from the ratio value above. Log the station call sign corresponding to the center frequency at which Detect occurred, together with that computed SNR, and an asterisk on a WSPR display line.

–As soon as a conventional WSPR decoder decode subsequently happens on that frequency, log its SNR in the conventional way.  Update the stored set of frequencies and call signs with the decoded information.   Revise any “Detect” events above that have mistaken the station call sign that goes with a given center frequency.

TU & GL on 2200m/630m WSPR!”


Additions, corrections, clarifications, etc? Send me a message on the Contact page or directly to KB5NJD gmail dot (com)!