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Current Operating Frequency and Mode

OFF AIR for storms, probably for much of the week if the forecast holds

Some paths were very good while others were attenuated – it just depended on where you were located and when you were on the air; Unanticipated G1 storm levels for a single reporting period but no defined onset enhancement was observed; Excellent trans-Atlantic openings prior to 0500z; Path to Japan from VK and KH6 remains open but KL7 was subject to high latitude absorption

– Posted in: 630 Meter Daily Reports, 630 Meters

The details for January 14, 2017 can be viewed here.

The UTC amateur registration database is here.

Working grids for the first time in 2018? Be sure to upload your logs to LoTW so the 630m operators participating in the 2018 Grid Chase Event can receive credit. Details on LoTW can be viewed here.

The current band plan used on 630 meters can be viewed HERE

WAS operator list detailing stations that are two-way QSO-capable can be viewed here.

Spot stations calling CQ on any mode here on DXSummit and help them find a Q

 

It was mostly quiet during the evening in North America but by morning, storms ranged from South America through the Caribbean  and as far North as the mid Atlantic region of the US were present again.  Parts of southwestern Europe remain active through parts of the Mediterranean region.  The Pacific Rim remains very active with Australia  receiving the brunt of activity from the west central region of the continent along the northern and eastern coast into the Sea of Tasman.  The north island of New Zealand  continues to experience lightning and storm activity as well.  Japan is dotted with a few storms, particularly to the South.  The entire Pacific Rim is a tough region to operate from this time of year.

11-hour worldwide lightning summary

 

Geomagnetic conditions reached G1 storm levels, (Kp = 5) which was a bit of a surprise and was due to a solar wind stream from a geoeffective coronal hole that turned out to be stronger than anticipated. The Bz is once again neutral this morning and solar wind velocities are averaging near 550 km/s.  DST values decreased in-step with the onset of storm conditions.

 

 

 

This session is difficult to characterize.  Propagation appeared to be “just average” at best but a number of stations took advantages of openings and pockets of activity to make contacts or reports.  It does not seem like there was an onset enhancement for the lower latitudes although there were a number of late evening QSO’s completed.  I suspect that this may have been due to elevated weekend / late night activity during this time.  Early evening operating really depended on mode or location of the stations.  Openings appeared short at best until later in the evening when longer openings were reported.  Trans-Atlantic opening were very robust as was the path to Japan from Oceania and Hawaii.  If you ask ten different people how this session was, you will get a number of different answers.

Reverse beacon network reports follow:

 

Jim, W5EST, submitted the following screen captures of his WSJTx console showing JT9 activity observed at his station in Little Rock, Arkansas:

courtesy W5EST

 

The following stations provided reports of their two-way QSO’s and/or any additional activity that might have occurred during this session (this is not necessarily a complete list – only what was reported!):

Wayde, K3MF, reported JT9 QSO’s with  K2BLA, K0KE, and NC0B.  Using CW, Wayde completed a QSO with W3TS who has made some station improvements including a 200-foot top hat Marconi using 20-watt TPO.  The length of the vertical section of the Marconi is unknown.

Tom, WB4JWM, reported JT9 QSO’s with WA9CGZ and K9KFR.

Keith, K0KE, reported that “Conditions seemed poor last night, the far northern Canadian NDBs that were good the night before were weak or non existent last night.  I stayed up late to 0600z CQing to no avail.  An hour after I went to bed KL7L shows up in the 0700z hour with two CQs  decoded at -26 and -27.  I worked K3MF, W0YSE and VE7VV.  Rob, NC0B and I had a nice SSB qso mid-day yesterday.”

Hans, DK8ND, reported yesterday that he would be QRV on CW during the evening and it seems that he found quite a bit of success.  Andy, F6CNI, who was “receive-only” reported that Hans was RST 589 at 1832z and added that there were six other stations calling him at that time.  Tom, DK1IS, completed a QSO with Hans at 1846z, as reported by F6CNI.  Clemens, DL4RAJ reported Hans at S8, noting that he was drifting a bit while transmitting.

Ken, K5DNL, reported a JT9 QSO with W0YSE.  Using WSPR overnight, Ken reported 23 stations and he received reports from 89 unique stations including KL7L,  F6GEX,  F1AFJ,  K9FD (/KH6),  F59706,  EA2HB, ZF1EJ and ten Canadian stations.  Be sure to check Ken’s website for items for sale, including 630-meter amplifiers, low pass filters, and scope match sensor heads.

Neil, W0YSE, reported a good session from Vancouver in spite of the deteriorating geomagnetic conditions.  He submitted the following comments and statistics:

Last evening I gleaned 3 JT9 QSO’S: K0KE (CO), NC0B (C0), and K5DNL (OK). I am always glad to see that I am getting out to the east and SE. I am amazed that Ken, K5DNL can decode me even when his signals up my way are not overly strong. I think it might mean that my receiving is not as good as most other stations on 630m.

I tossed out many CQ’s on CW last evening, and on several different frequencies: 474.2, then 474.5 and 475.0, and ended up with 474.74 (cuz I kinda like the alternating 7’s and 4’s. looks cool 😎) Got responses into both CW skimmers in VE6, altho the reported frequencies are often 200 to 300 hz lower than my actual freq. 

On WSPR, my 2w was heard by 36 stations. Here are the DX over 3000km…

…and I was able to hear these: K5DNL, K9FD, KA7OEI, KR6LA, W1IR (2x, -22 and -26), and my “almost local, and always reliable”, W7IUV whose daytime WSPR (even at 1w) is a welcome decode on my screen. Larry and I are often the only daytime beacons in the PNW. We are keeping the ether stirred up almost 24/7.

I am open to test other modes by arrangement if anyone is interested. I enjoy experimenting.

Al, K2BLA, reported “Low noise last 24 hours but significant QSB. Worked K3MF on JT-9 for new 2018 grid. Did not hear any other JT-9 activity. WSPR: heard by 52 and heard 19. Two ways with K9FD.”

Robert, KR7O, reported “Attenuated conditions, especially to the PNW but there was still quite a bit of QSO activity between 0200-0530Z.  K2BLA popped in on JT9 in the 11Z hour for the only TC.  Heard by 12 on WSPR, but VE6JY and K9FD were the only reporters over 1400km.  Heard 17, including N1BUG (29), ZF1EJ, AA1A (-29), K9FD, W1IR (30/-20), W4BCX (7/-25), K2BLA (3/-15) and KL7L.  I think this was my first reception of N1BUG and my best TC DX.  No TC until after around 0500Z.

ZF1EJ 6 spots, -27

KL7L 8 spots, -18

K9FD 108 spots, -5

Roger, VK4YB, reported a “Good path to Japan. Terrible QRN as usual.

Roger, G3XBM, reported that “Last night my incredibly poor system managed to copy 20 unique stations on 472kHz WSPR. Best was N1BUG at 4940km…

It was a slow night at KB5NJD as I made a few calls on CW but did not receive my first reverse beacon network report until mid evening.  The band seemed very short in terms of openings during the early evening.  I made a few calls using GMSK, not really expecting anyone to respond but maybe more to make other operators wonder what the mode was.  I made a single transmissions using WSPR, confirming shorter hops at CW levels.  I QRT’ed fairly early after not observing much of a “bump” in propagation due to the G1 storm conditions.  Noise was low.  Look for me to branch out to a few other modes in addition to CW and JT9.  Im interesting in playing with keyboard-to-keyboard modes, not just “rapid” QSO modes.

Trans-Atlantic WSPR summary follows:

ZF1EJ -> LA2XPA

PA3ABK/2 -> N3FL

DL6TY -> AA1A

F4DTL -> AA1A

DH5RAE -> AA1A, N1BUG

G8HUH -> AA1A, N1BUG

PA0A -> KA1R, N1BUG

PA3ABK/2 -> KA1R, N1BUG

F1AFJ -> KA1R, AA1A, N1BUG

K5DNL -> EA2HB, F1AFJ, F59706, F6GEX

W1XP -> LA2XPA, G8HUH, PA7EY, G0LUJ

W4BCX -> EA8BFK, G0LUJ, LA2XPA, PA3ABK/2

W1IR -> F1AFJ, F59706, F5WK, F6GEX, G0LUJ, LA2XPA, OR7T, PA0O, PA0RDT, PA3ABK/2

AA1A -> DH5RAE, DL/PA0EHG, DL0HT, EA1BNF, F1AFJ, F4DTL, F59706, F5WK, F6CNI, F6GEX, G0LUJ, G0VQH, G4KPX, G4ZFQ, LA2XPA, LA3EQ, M0NKA, OR7T, PA0EHG, PA0O, PA0RDT, PA1EJO, PA3ABK/2, PA7EY, PI4THT

N1BUG -> DH5RAE, DK6UG, DL/PA0EHG, DL0HT, DL1KAI, DL4RAJ, DL4RAJ/2, EA1BNF, EA2HB, EA8BFK, F1AFJ, F4DTL, F59706, F5WK, F6GEX, G0LUJ, G0MJI, G0VQH, G3XBM, G4KPX, G4ZFQ, LA2XPA, LA3EQ, M0NKA, M0TAZ, OR7T, PA0EHG, PA0O, PA0RDT, PA1EJO, PA3ABK/2, PA7EY

Trans-Pacific WSPR summary follows:

K9FD -> 7L1RLL4, JA1PKG, JA3TVF, JE1JDL, JH3XCU, KL7L, TNUKJPM, ZF1EJ

VK4YB -> JA1PKG, JA3TVF, JE1JDL, JH3XCU, K9FD, KJ6MKI, KK6EEW, KL7L, KPH, KR6LA, TNUKJPM, VA7MM, VE6JY, VE7CNF, W6SFH

 

Hideo, JH3XCU, submitted this link detailing DX -> JA WSPR decode totals and DX -> JA WSPR S/N peaks for the session, as reported on the Japanese language 472 kHz website.

 

Regional and continental WSPR breakdowns follow:

North American 24-hour WSPR summary

 

European 24-hour WSPR summary

 

Asiatic Russian 24-hour WSPR summary

 

Japanese 24-hour WSPR summary

 

Indonesian 24-hour WSPR summary

 

Oceania 24-hour WSPR summary

 

Eden, ZF1EJ, reported eleven WSPR stations and he received reports from 59 unique stations including LA2XPA.  He shared two-way reports with K9FD.

ZF1EJ session WSPR summary

 

Laurence, KL7L, reported seven WSPR stations.  K0KE received Laurence’s JT9 CQ’s around 0700z.

KL7L session WSPR summary

 

Merv, K9FD (/KH6), reported eleven WSPR stations including VK4YB. He shared two-way reports with K2BLA, K5DNL, KA7OEI, KR6LA, W0YSE, W7IUV and ZF1EJ.  Merv received reports from 39 unique stations including 7L1RLL4, JA1PKG, JA3TVF, JE1JDL, JH3XCU, KL7L and TNUKJPM.

K9FD session WSPR summary

 


Additions, corrections, clarifications, etc? Send me a message on the Contact page or directly to KB5NJD *A T*  gmail dot (com)!