NJDTechnologies

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Typical Operating Schedule

Usually QRV CW most evenings, tuning between 472.5 kHz and 475 kHz with CQ's on or near 474.5 kHz. Occasionally QRV JT9, 474.2 kHz dial + 1000 - 1350 Hz. QRV some mornings starting around 1100z on CW. Sked requests are welcome. All activity is noise and WX permitting

Another lean night back East for domestic openings but a few active western stations trying to take advantage of openings using modes like GMSK and JT9; Many strong trans-Atlantic openings reaching into the central US again; Trans-Pacific openings are plentiful for stations in quiet locations including KL7, KH6 and JA; W5EST presents: ”Part 3: At Your 630m Station, When Does Sun First Increase D-Region RF Absorption?”

– Posted in: 630 Meter Daily Reports, 630 Meters

The details for January 11, 2017 can be viewed here.

The UTC amateur registration database is here.

Working grids for the first time in 2018? Be sure to upload your logs to LoTW so the 630m operators participating in the 2018 Grid Chase Event can receive credit. Details on LoTW can be viewed here.

The current band plan used on 630 meters can be viewed HERE

WAS operator list detailing stations that are two-way QSO-capable can be viewed here.

Spot stations calling CQ on any mode here on DXSummit and help them find a Q

 

A few storms were present in the central US and continue in the northern Caribbean.  The southern half of Europe through the Mediterranean region remains active with storms while northern Europe is mostly storm free.  Central Japan remains active and most of Oceania has been impacted by storms in one capacity or another.

11-hour worldwide lightning summary

 

Geomagnetic conditions are very quiet. The Bz is pointing slightly to the North this morning and solar wind velocities are averaging near 400 km/s.  DST values remain near the centerline and are generally stable.

 

 

 

Reverse beacon network reports follow:

courtesy Reverse Beacon Network

 

Jim, W5EST, submitted the following screen capture of his WSJTx console showing JT9 activity observed at his station in Little Rock, Arkansas:

courtesy W5EST

 

The following stations provided reports of their two-way QSO’s and/or any additional activity that might have occurred during this session (this is not necessarily a complete list – only what was reported!):

Tom, WB4JWM, completed a JT9 QSO with Joe,  K9MRI, during the early evening.

Sal, K1RGO, reported CW QSO’s with W1XP, W3TS, K9MRI, K8RYU and K9SLQ.

Neil, W0YSE, reported JT9 QSO’s with three stations and a bit of experimentation with a mode that hasn’t seen wide use under amateur rules yet.  Neil offered the following comments and statistics:

“Last evening I had JT9 Q’s with KL7L (AK), AH6EZ (WA), AND N6PIG (WA).

It is sure nice to see Laurence, KL7L coming thru in the evenings lately, AND a real treat to be decoded by him on JT9.

Other JT9 stations seen on my screen were KR7O, VE7BDQ, and VE7VV,

I had some dialog with Roger, VE7VV on the chat page and we tried some GMSK15 on several separate time slots, but signals were too weak for that mode and got worse as the evening wore on. Roger said that he DID copy a few characters from my 2w EIRP GMSK signal early on. We decided that whenever we are connecting with JT9, and if the signals are strong enough, we could send a free message like “TRY GMSK15 ??”, so that is our plan.

On WSPR my beacon was decoded by 31 stations. Here are the most distant ones:

…and I heard these wspr-ers: AE5X, K5DNL, K9FD, KL7L, KR6LA, NU6O, VA7JX, VA7MM, and VE7BDQ.”

Robert, KR7O, reported “Quiet conditions, but low activity and somewhat depressed regional signals.  On JT9, I worked AH6EZ and VE7BDQ for the first time and was heard by N9RU.  Several JT9 stations were active around 0430-0530Z, including KL7L K9KFR and NO3M were the only TC signals copied.  Heard by 20 on WSPR, best K9/SWL.  Heard 16, including W3LPL (9/-24), W1IR (9/-25) and ZF1EJ for the only TC.  Both W1IR and W3LPL would pop in for a period or two and then disappear, teasing of some potential openings.

ZF1EJ 3 spots, -28

KL7L 69 spots, -7

K9FD 112 spots, -1

VK4YB 4 spots, -25″

Ken, K5DNL, indicated that he operated WSPR during this session, reporting twenty stations and he received reports from 86 unique stations including LA2XPA, EA8BFK, G0LUJ, KL7L, K9FD (/KH6) and  ZF1EJ.  Ken also indicates that he has this amp available for sale.  Details at K5DNL.com.

Trans-Atlantic WSPR summary follows:

DH5RAE -> AA1A

EA7HPM -> AA1A

PA0A -> AA1A

ZF1EJ -> EA8BFK, LA2XPA

W1XP -> LA2XPA, EA8BFK

K5DNL -> EA8BFK, G0LUJ, LA2XPA

W3LPL -> A8BFK, G0LUJ, LA2XPA

AA1A -> DH5RAE, DL4RAJ, DL4RAJ/2, EA2HB, EA8BFK, EB8ARZ/1, F1AFJ, F59706, F5WK, F6GEX, G0LUJ, G0VQH, G3WCB, G4ETG, G4KPX, G4ZFQ, LA2XPA, LA3EQ, M0NKA, ON5TA, OR7T, PA0O, PA0RDT

W1IR -> DH5RAE, DJ0ABR, DL/PA0EHG, DL0HT, DL4RAJ, DL4RAJ/2, DL5XL, EA8BFK, F1AFJ, F59706, F5WK, F6GEX, G0LUJ, G0VQH, G4KPX, G4ZFQ, LA2XPA, LA3EQ, M0NKA, M0TAZ, ON5TA, OR7T, PA0EHG, PA0O, PA0RDT, PA7EY

Trans-Pacific WSPR summary follows:

VE7BDQ -> JA1PKG

KL7L -> 7L1RLL4, JA1PKG, JA3TVF, JH3XCU, K9FD, TNUKJPM

K9FD -> 7L1RLL4, JA1PKG, JA3TVF, JE1JDL, JH3XCU, TNUKJPM, ZF1EJ

VK4YB -> JA1PKG, JA3TVF, K9FD, KK6EEW, KL7L, KR6LA, KR7O, NU6O, TNUKJPM, VE6JY, VE6XH, VE7BDQ

 

Hideo, JH3XCU, submitted this link detailing DX -> JA WSPR decode totals and DX -> JA WSPR S/N peaks for the session, as reported on the Japanese language 472 kHz website.

 

Regional and continental WSPR breakdowns follow:

North American 24-hour WSPR summary

 

European 24-hour WSPR summary

 

African 24-hour WSPR summary

 

Asiatic Russian 24-hour WSPR summary

 

Japanese 24-hour WSPR summary

 

Oceania 24-hour WSPR summary

 

Pacific 24-hour WSPR summary

 

Eden, ZF1EJ, reported twelve WSPR stations and he received reports from 56 unique stations including EA8BFK and LA2XPA.

ZF1EJ session WSPR summary

 

Laurence, KL7L, reported that he completed “…JT9 qsos with W0YSE and VE7BDQ;    JT9 RX AH6EZ, VE7CC, VK4YB also appeared – BDQs JT9 beacon prevalent – cw strength at times.  Early shut out of stations suddenly here at just after 1600z – not sure why- iono related but cant see anything obvious…mag/sol/wise.”  Overnight, Laurence reported eight WSPR stations including VK4YB and he received reports from 25 unique stations including 7L1RLL4, JA1PKG, JA3TVF, JH3XCU and TNUKJPM.  He shared two-way reports with K9FD, KR6LA, NU6O, VA7MM, VE7BDQ and W0YSE.

KL7L session WSPR summary

 

Merv, K9FD (/KH6), reported thirteen WSPR stations. He shared two-way reports with K5DNL, KL7L, KR6LA, NU6O,  VE7BDQ, VK4YB, W0YSE, W3LPL and ZF1EJ.  Merv received reports from 53 unique stations including 7L1RLL4, JA1PKG, JA3TVF, JE1JDL, JH3XCU and TNUKJPM.

K9FD session WSPR summary

 

Jim, W5EST, presents, “PART 3: AT YOUR 630M STATION, WHEN DOES SUN FIRST INCREASE D-REGION RF ABSORPTION?”

“Yesterday’s blog asked how the very early declines in pre-sunrise 630m SNRs might be calculated better.  http://njdtechnologies.net/011018/   If scattered solar ionizing radiation from the terminator deep into the pre-SR D-region, then the  ionospheric night “shadow” still left untouched would have a radius slightly less than the radius of the Earth by about 60km. (Endnote 1*)  That way, SNR downramp time advancements would calculate nearer to observations. (Endnote 2**)

Today’s first illustration shows the calculated advancements by geographic latitude and month of the year.  Use the “N” months labeled in black to regard the graph lines as Northern Hemisphere latitudes N. Use the “S” months to regard the graph lines as Southern Hemisphere latitudes S instead. The graph lines tell the time advancement in minutes of hypothetical solar scattering ionization “sunrise” deep in the pre-SR D-region relative to the geographic Earth surface position directly beneath it.

The second illustration graphs the time adjustment to subtract from the advancement of the above graph to translate to advancement relative to eastward station sunrise SR.  Except for clarifying that the up-rising curves–middle of this second graph–translate to westward station SR, it’s the same surface-SR time adjustment graph shown earlier in this blog: http://njdtechnologies.net/010518/   (On some path headings some times of year, westward station SR comes earlier than eastward station SR.)

The third illustration graphs the effective duration of night before the hypothetical scattering solar ionizing radiation reaches the D-region from the terminator.  I’m ignoring residual nighttime radiation onto the D-region from cosmic rays and scattering from a high altitude region called the geocorona that the sun irradiates.

In summary, the last few blog posts have provided the time advancements corresponding to different concepts of the pre-SR D-region.  As I see it, your MF RF signal crosses the D-region on ascent and also crosses the D-region elsewhere on descent.  At each RF D-region crossing, the pre-SR D-region at first experiences scattered solar ionizing radiation as discussed today, then solar visible light. Still later in pre-SR regime, solar ionizing radiation that has passed through the daytime D-region goes underneath it but above the ozone layer and reaches the pre-SR D-region.

Finally, due to rotating Earth, each RF D-region crossing rotates through the terminator itself and becomes directly bathed in morning solar ionizing radiation.  As the sun rises, the elevation angle of that solar ionizing radiation reaches a highest point at solar noon over a D-region RF crossing.

As 630m night becomes pre-sunrise, SNR downramp sequences we see on 630m result from the accumulated effect of successive pre-SR events discussed above, followed by further RF absorption in the D-region because of increasing elevation angle of direct solar irradiation in the morning.  Irregularities in the D-region stirred up by the various events, as well as phasing QSB produce SNR departures from smooth SNR curves from simple models.

TU & GL on LF/MF!”

*ENDNOTE 1: Derive fictitious negative hfictbelow Earth surface to substitute for hoz ozone height 30km, Endnote 2.  Angle A terminator-to-ozone layer is
A=arccos[(RE+ hoz)/(RE+ hD)].
RE: Earth radius 6371km.  hD: ht. of D-region, say 60km.  The distance from terminator to ozone layer is x= (RE+ hD)sinA.  Distance down from D-region to the fictitious negative distance is:
hD – hfict =2x sinA. Solve to get hfict = hD – 4(hD – hoz)[(RE+ (hD+ hoz)/2)/(RE+ hD)]. The bracketed quantity is very near 1.0. Plug in values for hD and hoz to get hfict =~ -60km.
**ENDNOTE 2:  In the spreadsheet formula, use the -60km value in place of ozone layer height hoz  in first endnote of  http://njdtechnologies.net/010318/  .
TnightD = 2x(24hr/2π)arccos{tanL tanøcosα
                          + sqrt[1+(tanø0 cosα)2] sqrt[1-((RE+hfict)/(RE+hD))2]/cosL }
L: Latitude. Phi ø0 = 23.43695° tilt of Earth axis. Alpha α: day d of year relative to June solstice, given as angle α  by: α = (2π/365.25)(d-171)
Earth surface night uses the first part of the above formula as follows:
TnightSurf = 2x(24hr/2π)arccos{tanL tanøcosα}
These formulas are not astronomically precise but believed close enough for radio purposes.

 

 


Additions, corrections, clarifications, etc? Send me a message on the Contact page or directly to KB5NJD gmail dot (com)!